1910: Midnight Game Won by Athletic Team

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MIDNIGHT BALL GAME IS WON BY ATHLETIC TEAM

Large Crowd Present to Witness the Annual Baseball Novelty — No Clouds to Obscure the Light But Weather Was Too Cool For Fast Work — Score 11 to 8

June 22, 1910, Daily News-Miner

In the presence of one of the largest crowds seen at the park this season, the Athletics last night defeated their rivals, the Californias, by a score of 11 to 8, making the games two all that have been won by the respective nines this season.

Many persons who do not ordinarily turn out for baseball were to be seen in the grand stand, which was filled to overflowing, simply because it was the midnight game.  A total of 353 paid admissions were taken in.

Five minutes after 11 o’clock Bob Geis, the veteran ball player who returned the night before, stepped onto the diamond as umpire, being given an ovation by the crowd.  Just at 12 or at the end of the fourth inning, the two teams lined up in front of the grand stand to have their picture taken.  Various other pictures of the two aggregations in action were also taken from the field.  No clouds arose along the northern sky to obscure the light and the night was ideal, except for the fact that it was too cold for fast ball.

To the cold weather can be attributed some of the slow work of the match and part of the errors.  Other errors were due to the inability to distinctly make out a fast driven ball cutting the grass in line with the dark grand stand and the row of willows showing up over the bleacher fence.

To the work of Eddie Stroecker more than to any other one person, is the victory of the Athletics attributable, as he put life and confidence into his team and made use of his head at all time in playing his team.  Anderson twirled for the Athletics, but was not in his usual form.  Courtemanche was up for the Californias and was decidedly  off color.  The whip of Myers, catcher for the Californias, was not working with its accustomed surety last night, but in all these cases the cold was partially responsible.

The game was the first in which the Athletics have been seen in their new crimson suits and the  bunch felt that they had to make good.   Contrasted with the green of the Californias, the two teams present a pretty spectacle.

The Californias led off.  Koon heading the batting order.   He made three futile swings at the first three balls.  Griffin followed with a little grounder to Wilson at second, who took a little more time than was necessary, and then in tossing it to first threw high.  Myers followed with a grounder in the same place, which was dropped by Goodman.  Kennedy, next up, sent a high buzzer close to first base line, which Anderson dropped in trying to catch Kennedy off of first threw high, and Myers came home on the passed ball.  Chapin hit to second, who dropped it.   Renwick followed with a fly ball to the same place and the side was out.   Kennedy being left on third.

Anderson was first at bat for the Athletics, and was given a pass.   Goodman lifted one into the hands of Renwick in left field.  Kavanaugh laid one down to third, who played it to second, catching Anderson.  Heath rolled his to Courtemanche in the pitcher’s box, which was fielded to first, retiring the side.   Score Californias, 2; Athletics, 0.

Ford opened in the second with a free one to first, but was caught a minute later in trying to steal second.  Courtemanche picked one, but it was not sage, his long drive to left being taken in by Cathcart.  Koon drove a swift one to Heath, but the latter was too slow in heaving the ball to first and the runner was safe.   Griffin batted to second, who fumbled it.  Myers stepped up determined to score the two men on bases, but his effort resulted in a grounder to Anderson and an out at first.

With the last of the second Stroecker started the fireworks with a two bagger to left, which he stretched into three bags, through a wide throw to the bag.   Wilson fanned; Carr’s fly to center was mailed by Kennedy, and it looked as though the Athletic catcher would die on third.  Green, however, picked one that struck the ground in front of the pitcher, bounded over his head and cut second bag, where the frantic efforts of short and second failed to stop it.  Cathcart lifted a popup to Koon, who dropped it.  Anderson laid a little buzzer down close to the plate and Myers fielded it to first, who also dropped it, filling the bases.  After dallying for a few seconds, Green started to come home on the play, but Koon recovered the ball and caught the runner at the plate.  Score Californias, 2; Athletics, 1.

A safe hit, just over second, by Kennedy, started the third inning off.  Calhoun flew out to Heath at short, who tried to double to first to tag Kennedy before he could get back to the sack.  The throw was low and Goodman let it go by, while Kennedy rambled on to second.  Chapin tried three times to connect but without results.  Renwick laid a hot one down to Anderson.  It bounced from him, but was recovered and then held too long to stop either Kennedy at third or the striker at first.   Ford fanned, retiring the side.

Goodman took four wide ones and then stole second.  Kavanaugh failed to connect, but Heath got on when Koon got off the base in taking the throw from Courtemanche, who fielded Heath’s grounder.  Goodman stole third and Heath ended his career at second.  Goodman came home on the play and was safe through a wide throw to the plate.  Stroecker stepped up and was hit with a pitched ball, the sphere finding a lodging place in his pocket, from which receptacle he picked it out and tossed it back to the pitcher after he was on first.  Stroecker stole second and third, but was left there when Wilson fanned.

Score, Californias, 2; Athletics, 2.

Three men only came up for the Californias in the fourth.   Courtemanche fanned; Koon went down, Anderson to Goodman, and Griffin followed Courtemanche’s example.

For the Athletics, Carr’s single to Calhoun was held, and then Green got on by a grounder which bounded through Griffin.  Cathcart walked and a moment afterward Green was caught asleep at second.  Anderson singled to center and the ball was played to third to catch Cathcart.  Griffin missed it and Cathcart came on home, being safe when Courtemanche, who had come in to take the play at the plate, dropped the ball.  Anderson scored a second later on a passed ball.  The side was retired when one from Goodman was fielded, Ford to Koon.  Score, Californias 2; Athletics, 4.

The fifth inning was opened by Myers, with a safe hit just inside first, but the runner was nabbed immediately afterward at second, throw being Stroecker to Wilson.  Kennedy was presented with a ticket to the first station.  Calhoun laid a nice one down to the pitcher, who played it to second.  An easy double was in sight, but in his eagerness to heave the ball to first, second dropped it, and both men were safe.  Chapin could not touch the ball.  Kennedy stole third and Calhoun second.  Then Renwick walked and the bases were full.  Ford laid one down to Heath at short.  It was a long throw to first, but the ball arrived in time to retire the side without a score.

Kavanaugh took three tries at the ball but without results.   Heath then found a hole between short and third and went forward one station when Stroecker walked.  Wilson singled over short, but left was backing the play so closely that Heath did not dare try for more than one bag on the play.  With bases full Carr touched one that was returned to the plate, catching Heath before he could tally.  Green laid a buzzer down the third base line which he beat out, Stroecker coming in on the hit.  Then while the Californias were arguing with the umpire, Carr on second started to force Wilson home from third.  The ball was snapped to home and then juggled back and forth to head the player off, being finally dropped, scoring the runner.  Cathcart fanned.  Score Californias, 2; Athletics, 6.

The sixth was the California’s inning, Courtemanche leading off with a safe one between center and right field.  He stole second; Koon walked; and then Courtemanche scored on Griffin’s hit over first.  Myers found another safe place just over short, and Koon scored.  Kennedy laid one down to the pitcher, who unsuccessfully tried to catch one of the other runners and the bases were full, with two tallies and no outs.  Calhoun’s long fly to left field was handled by Cathcart, but the throw to the plate was a little wide and Griffin came home.  Chapin again futilely tried to land on the ball.  The side was out on Renwick’s fly to Heath.

During the last of the inning it looked as though the performance of the Californias would be repeated as the bases were speedily filled.  Anderson walked; Goodman hit over third, and Kavanaugh laid one down on the infield that was so slow he beat it to the bag.  Heath bunted, but the ball was played home, nipping Anderson at the plate.  Goodman scored on a passed ball.  Stroecker lifted a high one to Calhoun and Wilson fanned.

Score, Californias, 5! Athletics, 7. 

Again in the seventh, but three Californias faced the pitcher.   Ford went out, Heath to Goodman, Courtemanche laid one inside the plate which Stroecker heaved to first in plenty of time; and Koon was  stopped by a high fly to Wilson.

Carr led off in the last of the inning with a safe hit over third and was sacrificed to second by Green.  Cathcart was hit with a pitched ball then both runners were advanced a bag by Anderson’s sacrifice.  Goodman hit over short, scoring Carr, while Cathcart came home on the throw and Goodman went to second.   Kavanaugh followed with a hot drive to Calhoun, who threw low to first.  Koon failed to stop the ball and Goodman scored.  Heath went down on a grounder, Griffin to Koon.

Score, Californias, 5; Athletics, 10.

A base on balls was the opening present to the Californias in the eight, Griffin being the recipient of the favor.  He stole second and went to third on the high throw by Stroecker in the attempt to catch him at the second stopping place.   Myers singled over second, scoring Griffin.  Kennedy found a safe place for a grass cutter between second and first.  Calhoun’s grounder was fielded by Kavanaugh, who threw home, and Myers was safe.  Chapin repeated the program of one, two, three swings, but Renwick found a vacant spot in center field and Kennedy romped home.   Ford lifted a long one to Carr, on which Calhoun tried to score after the catch.   The ball was relayed in and the veteran was topped.

Stroecker again opened the Athletic’s half of the inning by a hit, this being a single over second.  He then stole second and third.  Wilson fanned and Carr popped out to Ford.  Green followed with a fast one which Ford failed to stop, and Stroecker added another tally to the Athletics’ score.  Cathcart’s long fly was pulled down by Kennedy.

Score, Californias, 8; Athletics, 11.

With the determination of at least tieing the score, the Californias came up for the last time in the ninth with a safe hit by Courtemanche, who sent the ball past second.  Koon fanned.  Griffin also failed to connect, but the third strike was dropped and the ball had to be played to first to stop him, Courtemanche going to second..  Myers, the heavy sticker of the Californias, stepped up determined to score Courtemanche, but the latter was caught off second, Anderson to Wilson, and the game was over.

Courtemanche struck out 7 men and walked 5.  Anderson fanned 10 and gave passes to 5.

Score by innings:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Californias

2

0

0

0

0

3

0

3

0

8

Athletics

0

1

1

2

2

1

3

1

0

11

.The teams lined up as follows:

Californias – Koon 1b, Griffin 3b, Myers c, Kennedy cf, Calhoun ss, Chapin rf, Renwick cf, Ford 2b, Courtemanche p.

Athletics – Anderson p, Goodwin 1b, Kavanaugh 3b, Heath ss, Wilson 2b, Stroecker c, Carr cf, Green rf, Cathcart lf.

June 22, 1910, Daily News-Miner

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